Two Teens Have Been Identified after bodies found in Jamaica Queens, New York

Police have released the names of the two teenagers who died after being pulled from the water in Jamaica Bay, Queens, on Friday. They are 13-year-old Ryan Wong and 13-year-old Daniel...

Police have released the names of the two teenagers who died after being pulled from the water in Jamaica Bay, Queens, on Friday.

They are 13-year-old Ryan Wong and 13-year-old Daniel Persaud, both from Queens.

First responders were sent to the water near Beach 121st Street and Newport Avenue just before noon Friday.

Witnesses told police the two teenagers had been standing on a sand bar when they went under the water.

One teenager was pulled from the water around 12:35 p.m., and the second was located around 1 p.m. Both were taken to a local hospital, where they were pronounced dead.

Police have released the identities of the two teenage boys who drowned Friday after going under water off a beach in Queens.

Ryan Wong and Daniel Persaud, both 13 years old, were with a group of friends along Jamaica Bay when they fell into the water and were swept away around 11:40 a.m.

A candlelight vigil for Wong is set for Monday at 7 p.m. at Jamaica Bay. Other memorials and services are planned for the coming days.

The circumstances leading up to the boys’ fall into the water is still under investigation.

A team of at least nine rescue swimmers was dispatched to the beach Friday along with the NYPD’s harbor unit, air and sea rescue, and the FDNY in what became a lengthy search for the teens.

Divers recovered the first boy around 12:30 p.m., and rescue teams raced to get the unresponsive 13-year-old to an ambulance. It would take another 45 minutes before they could locate the second teenager as they searched the waters of Pumpkin Patch Channel. Both were rushed to Jamaica Hospital.

One of the boys was pronounced dead not long after he was discovered, while the second fought for hours before he eventually died.

A sign posted near the water warns of strong current and sudden drop-offs, and a history of drownings at the Howard Beach coastline. Those who frequent the beach say that not many people swim there, and it’s more popular with fishermen and kite surfers.

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